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Warriors for Peace

Peace is hard won.

In America, most of us take peace for granted.

(I say this with the realization that there are many people in America who are struggling and don’t feel safe.)

Today is Memorial Day.

I’ve resisted this day a lot over my life.  I don’t like war and fighting.  When my children were young boys, I didn’t let them play with toy guns.  One of my sons figured out how to use sticks as guns instead.  It was a losing battle on my part…

I grew up in Beirut, Lebanon until 1976 when we escaped the civil war.  We rode to the airport in the back of a taxi, crouched down in the floor of the backseat of the car with a blanket thrown over us to protect us from shrapnel. This was after spending three days in the interior bathroom of our apartment while the sky rained rockets and mortar.

We were lucky.  We could leave the country.  There were many people who couldn’t including some of my friends who I never heard from again.

My experience left a strong desire for peace in my Heart.

I do the work that I do in this lifetime because I believe in a world of sustainable peace.

In my mind that meant that I was somewhat anti-military and, of course, anti-war.

Of course, the Universe with it’s amazing sense of humor, gave me a warrior son who joined the Army this spring.

Memorial Day has a very different meaning to me this year.

As I grapple with the fact that my son might be sent off to some hotspot war zone, I’ve had to work hard to make my own peace with his decision and my Mother Fear.

I started to think about all the soldiers who have impacted my life.

My Mother’s father, my grandfather, was killed in a tank in Volgograd Russia before she was even walking.  His death broke my grandmother’s Heart and she never recovered.  My Mother never had the experience of a father in her life.

American soldiers gave my Mother her first taste of chocolate and brought the starving people in her city bread and other food after the war.

My husband’s Father, who was Jewish, was part of the team of soldiers who liberated the Jews in Dachau.  He sang Jewish prayers and songs to calm the fears of the Jewish prisoners while they took down the fences and fed them.  The Jews would never have been liberated at all without soldiers who fought for their freedom.

My Father joined the army when we was young because it was the only route for him to be able to go to college.  The army ended up being a formative and powerful experience for him that helped him set the stage for success in his life and afforded my family an amazing life.

The work my Father went on to do with his life helped many communities around the world gain access to water and other vital resources.

My son in the army is a poet.  This is a young man who, when he was a small child, would literally have his breath taken away by the beauty of a stained glass window or the sight of a beautiful bird flying by.  He has a Heart that is bigger than his head.

He joined the military because the idea of children dying in a war zone is unacceptable to him.  (In Human Design, he has almost all of the Defense Circuit and the Channel 28/38 defined in his chart.)

When Houston flooded a few years ago, he was one of the first rescuers out in a boat rescuing stranded people.  He is not a fascist, war-mongering monster.

He is a Warrior for Peace.

The cost of war is high.  The fight for Peace is vital.  Until we align a critical mass of our collective consciousness around the dream of peace we will need “boots on the ground” to enforce boundaries and to fight for what’s right.

I’m not so idealistic as to take all the politics and messiness of dysfunctional leadership, shady economic motives for war and personal gain out of the equation.  We’re all human and this human story we are living in is very messy.

We must continue to work to create a strong, aligned leadership in our country and for the world.  We must continue to work to see what we all have in common and be mindful of any mindset that is divisive.  (Without ignoring the truth.)

And we have to continue cultivating a collective dream of Peace – one that’s strong enough to set the stage for us to begin to build it in the material world.

I want to take time today to honor all the soldiers who fought and lost their lives or had their Hearts permanently changed because of war. who fought for peace, who joined the military because they wanted to protect and serve and wanted it badly enough that they were willing to die for it.

I also want to honor their families who spent years holding their breath, writing letters, assembling care packages and praying until their soldier returned home.

Or endured the rest of their lives with a broken Heart.

Thank you for your Service.

From my Heart to Yours,

Karen

P.S.  Join me in holding a collective vision of Sustainable Peace today.  Watch this video and take some time to imagine what else is possible for us on this planet: